In Profile – Marylebone Online http://maryleboneonline.co.uk Marylebone's Online Home Tue, 14 Nov 2017 11:13:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 In Profile: Jeremy Houghton http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/lifestyle/in-profile-jeremy-houghton/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/lifestyle/in-profile-jeremy-houghton/#respond Fri, 09 Sep 2016 11:22:33 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3578 Award-winning artist to the Royals Jeremy Houghton is hosting an exhibition of his work in Gallery 8 in Duke Street in November, in support of Hope and Homes for Children. We caught up with in run up to the exhibition. How did you get into art to begin with? Did you always want to be an artist? [...]

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Award-winning artist to the Royals Jeremy Houghton is hosting an exhibition of his work in Gallery 8 in Duke Street in November, in support of Hope and Homes for Children. We caught up with in run up to the exhibition.


How did you get into art to begin with? Did you always want to be an artist?

If I’m completely honest my school reports were not the best – apart from when it came to art that is. If I ever had any spare time at school I could be found in the art classrooms drawing. My parents were very supportive of this. I was always surrounded by paintings in the family home while growing up. My mum never pursued a career in art, but she was a good painter in her own right and went to art school. I always dreaded doing a job which I couldn’t enjoy, and so it was slightly ironic that I eventually found myself getting blown off course and pursuing a law degree at Exeter University. I guess sometimes you have to make the wrong decisions to make the right decisions. I knew immediately I didn’t want this to be my future, so I went on to do a Foundation course in art at the Slade. I then spent six years as Head of Art at the International School of Cape Town, in South Africa – an experience that has had a profound mark on my life and art work. For me, it was the real boy to man experience. In fact, it was in South Africa that I first studied the movement of flamingos. This fascination of birds and flight remains a central theme in my work to this day.

In 2009 you were commissioned to paint HM The Queen – tell us about that!

Being in Cape Town, away from the norms and expectations of the UK, gave me the time to work out that I wanted to be a full time artist. But it wasn’t until I hit the big 30 (in 2004) that I took the plunge. It had to work financially, though, so that’s when I decided to come back to the UK. After my first exhibition in London in 2007, I was asked to shadow the Gentleman At Arms, and paint scenes from their 500th Anniversary year. One of the paintings from this residency was of The Queen at St James’ Palace. Fortunately for me, the painting opened up doors at Highgrove and Windsor. I’ve never looked back from there.

You were the official artist at the London 2012 Olympic Games, how did that come about?

By good fortune I happened to be one of a group of artists who were painting for Lloyds Bank as the Olympics approached. They were one of the sponsors of the Games and so I found myself being asked to produce more and more Olympic-themed paintings in the build up to 2012. To cut a long story short, BT also eventually became sponsors, and having seen my work they, and the Patrons of the Games, asked me to document the social and cultural significance of the London Olympics as the official painter in residence. It was a fascinating process – one which allowed me to explore the social and historic relevance of sport. I wanted to humanize the athletes and I hope I achieved that in my work.

How would you describe the style of your work? Are there underlying themes throughout?

Movement, light, space and a real fascination in flight are absolutely central themes of my art. This harks back to my time in South Africa. There’s so much you can paint there – there’s an infinity of options and for me it was the flamingos in the distance that caught my eye. If you see flamingos on the horizon, it almost looks like a mirage. There are thousands of birds and you’ve got the abstract shapes, the water, the colour, ever changing, always moving. It just gripped me. It’s those flamingos that have provided the inspiration for my ‘Flight’ portfolio. My flight studies are all done from my mind’s eye. I’m constantly trying out new ideas. The shapes between the birds it what fascinates me the most. I guess it’s a bit like poetry or music in that sense. Often the pauses are what makes a great poem or song, and that’s no different in terms of my paintings and the spaces between the birds in flight.

Tell us about the exhibition that’s coming up at Gallery 8

I do one London exhibition each year. They are a retrospective of what I’ve been working on in the last 12 months, so this year there will be work on display from my time in residence at the Americas Cup, for the James Hunt Foundation and with Goodwood. There will also, of course, be work from my ‘Flight’ portfolio.

Why have you chosen to support Hope & Homes for Children?

I have a very strong sense of home and a value for belonging. You can see this in my art work, and you can also see it in the projects which Hope and Homes for Children run across the world.
It’s a charity which finds safe, family based care for vulnerable children who would otherwise spend their childhoods in loveless orphanages. I have children of my own and we all live in the same house where I grew up as a child. My kids have dinner in the same room where I had my dinner with my parents, they wonder through my art studio and they play in the same garden where I had hours upon hours of fun as a kid. I have an incredibly strong sense of family and I feel unbelievably lucky to have this. If I can help in any way to give vulnerable children the chance to be part of a family, to live in a real home with a kitchen table and a bed of their own, then I want to do that.

For more information about Jeremy Houghton’s exhibition at Gallery 8, please email deborah.speirs@hopeandhomes.org.


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In Profile: Zana Morris, Founder of The Clock http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/lifestyle/in-profile-zana-morris-founder-of-the-clock/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/lifestyle/in-profile-zana-morris-founder-of-the-clock/#respond Wed, 15 Jun 2016 17:35:39 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3556 We talk to Zana Morris about Marylebone’s latest opening, The Clock. 1) Tell us how The Clock came about The Clock on Wimpole Street in Marylebone is the concept of myself and Karen Welman – we founded the award winning Library and Little Library gyms. The Clock is a culmination of all of our dreams [...]

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We talk to Zana Morris about Marylebone’s latest opening, The Clock.

1) Tell us how The Clock came about

The Clock on Wimpole Street in Marylebone is the concept of myself and Karen Welman – we founded the award winning Library and Little Library gyms. The Clock is a culmination of all of our dreams and aspirations to create a house of total wellness in the most luxe of surroundings, to reflect our clienteles’ own lifestyles.

2) What makes The Clock different from other gyms?

In the days of one size fits all super gyms, The Clock has a bespoke approach in next level luxe surroundings – behind the door of a classic Georgian townhouse in the heart of London is one of the most innovative, effective and luxurious private members clubs in the world – dedicated to health, wellbeing and inner and outer strength. Across four bright, airy and exquisite floors, furnished with original antiques and some pieces rescued from The Ritz, you need never leave the The Clock as it nurtures your body and soul, visually, physically, environmentally and emotionally. There’s the proven, hugely successful 15 minute High Intensity Training or private boxing in our wood panelled Library. There’s barre & yoga in classic Music Room complete with a baby-grand piano. Or you can simply pull up a chair in the beautiful farmhouse kitchen while our personal chef creates a tailored nutrition plan for you. And for the soul – relax with a coffee in our Drawing Room.

3) How important is nutrition at The Clock?

As a trained nutritionist and author of The High Fat Diet, a best seeing book, nutrition is really important at The Clock, with menus tailor made to best benefit each client. We also have an on-site chef who makes healthy, nutritional breakfasts and lunches in the warm, friendly kitchen – clients sit around the farmhouse table and chat while Leo rustles up an omelette…

4) You have other locations in London – why have you opened in Marylebone?

We are in Barnes and Notting Hill and were in Marylebone already – but when this beautiful building became available we felt it was the right area for our clients being a mix of residential and business and we were able to fulfil all of our dreams within one building. We both love Marylebone – the atmosphere, the architecture and the people.

5) Do you spend much time in the Marylebone area? Any favourites?

I spend a lot of time around here – I love Marylebone High Street and love to nip to the Ivy Café or to the Nordic Bakery. I also love the shops, the mix of new and traditional.

More info: www.theclock.com

The Clock, 42 Wimpole St, London W1G 8YF


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In Profile: CrossEyes http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-crosseyes/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-crosseyes/#respond Mon, 18 Apr 2016 20:53:43 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3534 We catch up with Marianne and Panos Nicolaou of innovative eyewear brand and opticians CrossEyes, based on Marylebone’s York Street. Tell us a bit about the CrossEyes concept The CrossEyes concept is built on honesty, dedication and smart design. Through honest and hardworking employees, and transparent prices, CrossEyes is able to create an environment where you [...]

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We catch up with Marianne and Panos Nicolaou of innovative eyewear brand and opticians CrossEyes, based on Marylebone’s York Street.


Tell us a bit about the CrossEyes concept

The CrossEyes concept is built on honesty, dedication and smart design. Through honest and hardworking employees, and transparent prices, CrossEyes is able to create an environment where you receive the right guidance when looking for quality spectacles. CrossEyes has hundreds of different custom made frames, which ensures that everyone can find glasses suitable for both their look and personality. At CrossEyes, we do not hide the prices – we display them for everyone to see.

What makes CrossEyes unique?

All our frames are Limited Edition, we only we have one of each frame in each of our stores, so you will not find many other people wearing the same frame! Our frames are particularly popular, not just because of the chic Danish Design but also because of the materials we use – frames made of bamboo and sustainable acetate are amongst our favourite frames. Finally, the prices of the glasses are on the wall – all frames are the same price which keeps the atmosphere relaxed, as there are no hidden, unexpected extras. All our frames can be made in to sunglasses with a long range of tints to choose from – again, all for the same price.

You have another store in Clerkenwell – why did you choose Marylebone?

We have had our eye on York Street for a long time, and are very pleased that we can now claim this location as part of our portfolio. The store is within a listed building and will look great amongst the other boutique shops and restaurants on the predominantly Georgian street in Marylebone.

This part of Marylebone is a little bit off the beaten track, so it has an authentic London feel, with some great pubs and other hidden gems, much like Clerkenwell. Panos is also Chairman of the Local Optical Committee (website www.kcwloc.com). The committee is not for profit and has had some real success in the last 12 months. It’s (not for profit) work has meant that opticians and optometrists in Kensington, Chelsea, Westminster, Hammersmith and Fulham can now deliver more NHS services in the community and cut hospital waiting times.

What’s next for the CrossEyes brand?

CrossEyes will focus on giving great service in a relaxed atmosphere. We will put a lot of our energy into delivering great quality rather than messing about with promotions, discounts and the hard sell. We are investing to keep developing our frames, with new designs in store on a monthly basis and to bring the concept to other towns and cities in the UK. We are all about good quality, good design at a fair price, but we also want to have some fun!

Do you spend much time in Marylebone? Any local favourites?

We’ve only been open for 3 months, local favourites so far are; The Royal Oak, The Duke of Wellington, The Chapel Inn, The Grazing Goat, The Everyman Cinema, but there is plenty more to explore, ask us again in a years’ time!


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In Profile: Cadenhead’s Steven Worrell http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-cadenheads-steven-worrell/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-cadenheads-steven-worrell/#respond Thu, 19 Nov 2015 02:04:19 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3393 Tell us about the history of Cadenhead’s Cadenhead’s started as a bottler of Single Malts and Rums in 1842. The first shop opened in Aberdeen on Netherkirk Gate Putachieside. The founder, William Cadenhead, wanted to offer the public whiskies that had been matured in the cask and then bottled at full cask strength. Cadenhead’s was [...]

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Tell us about the history of Cadenhead’s

Cadenhead’s started as a bottler of Single Malts and Rums in 1842. The first shop opened in Aberdeen on Netherkirk Gate Putachieside. The founder, William Cadenhead, wanted to offer the public whiskies that had been matured in the cask and then bottled at full cask strength. Cadenhead’s was pioneering in offering bottled stock, prior to this you would need to buy the cask and store it at home or have commissioned bottling, which could be rather expensive.

Shortly after the company was founded as a bottler of single malts, stories already began to appear about the demise of the company. People felt “It’s not commercially viable” and questioned “Who would want a whisky from a single distillery?”

We proved them wrong – for decades Cadenhead’s was the only bottler of single malts, and then in the late 1800’s a few more companies began to be established.

Springbank Distillers (J&A Mitchell) is the parent company of WM Cadenhead. Established in 1828, it’s Scotland’s oldest independent family owned and run distillery.

What’s it like to work for such an established whisky shop?

When you work with a family business as old as ours, you think about the history behind every aspect of the business, from how we select the barley for distilling and the process involved in turning barley into malt whisky, through to the ageing and finally the bottling. We still do 100% of production on-site, and we’re the only distillery to do so.

Tell us about your tasting events

Our tasting events are informative sessions that take people on a journey through the world of single malts. Evening tasting sessions help people discover the effect of microclimate, wood, water and geology, nature is the main influence on single malts.

Each single malt is unique, even from the same distillery; malts made on the same day and matured in identical looking casks can be as far apart in taste as sugar and salt. This is all down to the cask and how many times it has been used.

We never do hard selling during or after the tasting events. The events are not about making people part with money, it’s about them getting the best possible product available based on their taste and preferences.

You’ve been here for 8 years now. What changes have you seen in Marylebone?

Since we moved from the original site in Covent Garden to Chiltern Street so much has changed. The street looks amazing with its unique mix of retailers, all offering the best service possible in London. It’s hard to believe, but when we first opened the street looked a little tired with empty shops, similarly to how Covent Garden looked when we opened there over 21 years ago.

What is it like working on Chiltern Street?

When we first moved to Chiltern Street we did contemplate whether it was the right decision, given how well known we were. Moving shops felt like starting over again, but we feel this is the best move we could have hoped for. Not because we get as many people through the doors as we did in Covent Garden, but because we have been able to offer a better customer service – for us it’s about getting the right product to the customer based on taste rather than budget.


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In Profile: Trunk’s Mats Klingberg http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-trunks-mats-klingberg/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-trunks-mats-klingberg/#respond Fri, 13 Nov 2015 02:36:41 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3394 What’s the story behind Trunk so far? Trunk launched at 8 Chiltern Street in September 2010, with a tight edit of the best menswear and accessories from Japan, Italy, the US, UK and beyond. Most of the brands were brands I’d been buying for myself on trips to primarily Japan and Italy over the years, [...]

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What’s the story behind Trunk so far?

Trunk launched at 8 Chiltern Street in September 2010, with a tight edit of the best menswear and accessories from Japan, Italy, the US, UK and beyond. Most of the brands were brands I’d been buying for myself on trips to primarily Japan and Italy over the years, which weren’t available in London. Several of these brands are still our best sellers, such as Boglioli, Incotex, Alden, Aspesi and Barena.

With Trunk I wanted to create a shop that caters to an international audience of men seeking easy to wear, intelligently designed clothes, with no compromise on quality. At the same time I wanted to deliver a great experience in a warm and welcoming environment.

It’s going very well and since very early days we have loyal customers from all over the world in places like Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Stockholm, Zurich, Paris and of course London.

You’ve been around for 5 years. How have you seen Marylebone change?

I’ve lived in Marylebone since I moved to London ten years ago, so it’s changed a lot over the years and particularly in the last 2-3 years I think. On Chiltern Street almost half of the shops were empty when I moved in. Now there’s lots of construction going on and new residences, shops, restaurants and hotels popping up everywhere. There’s a great buzz and good energy in the air. This is the place to be.

You own two shops on the same road. Why Chiltern Street?

Marylebone was the natural choice because I lived here, but it also suited the positioning of Trunk really well. Trunk is all about nice wearable clothes of good quality and with understated and timeless designs. We’re not edgy or high fashion or super traditional, I see us somewhere in the middle. Just like Marylebone is in the middle of London.

I had had my eye on Chiltern Street for quite some time. I liked it because it was very central, but at the same time also very quiet and with a good neighbourhood feel without all the chain stores that you see all over London. Just as I got serious with my search for a location for Trunk I met Andre Balazs and when he told me he was turning the old fire station on Chiltern Street in to a hotel it was a done deal.

The units on Chiltern Street are fairly small, so it didn’t take very long until I felt we needed more space. We looked at different options, but then opted for another shop on Chiltern Street. The second shop Trunk LABS at 34 Chiltern Street has a great selection of luggage, accessories, bags and shoes.

What’s next?

Lots going on as always. We’re running out of space again, so are currently considering various options of how to best manage this. A big focus for next year is to develop a bigger range from our own brand. So far the sweaters, jackets and shirts we’ve done have been received very well, so doing more of our own brand feels like a natural next step. Early next year we’re also launching a made to measure service for suits and jackets made in Italy.

Do you spend much time in Marylebone? Any favourites?

As I live here I spend basically all of my time here when I’m in London. I love going for a run around Regent’s Park, browsing through all the books at Daunt’s and eating out at local restaurants, in particular Fischer’s, The Providores and of course, Chiltern Firehouse.


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In Profile: Claire Cheetham http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-claire-cheetham/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-claire-cheetham/#respond Wed, 11 Nov 2015 02:36:19 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3283 Claire Cheetham, along with Vince Cullen, run the Active Health Clinic located on Wigmore Street, just off Marylebone High Street. These two Osteopaths have over 45 years of experience between them in osteopathic health-care and are fully registered with the General Osteopathic Council. When did you open the clinic? I started practising from John Bell & Croyden the year after qualifying [...]

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Claire Cheetham, along with Vince Cullen, run the Active Health Clinic located on Wigmore Street, just off Marylebone High Street. These two Osteopaths have over 45 years of experience between them in osteopathic health-care and are fully registered with the General Osteopathic Council.

When did you open the clinic?

I started practising from John Bell & Croyden the year after qualifying as an osteopath in 1994, so 20 years now! It sounds awful when I hear myself say it, but the time has flown by (and yes, the police officers do look young now!). During my years here, I’ve had many people consult me at the clinic who both live and/or work in the Marylebone area. It has been a pleasure to get to know so many different individuals from diverse walks of life as well as helping them in their return to health.

What attracted you to set up in the Marylebone area?

I remember coming to Marylebone and falling in love with the quirkiness of it all! The fact that big multinational companies are located in the same vicinity as a tiny ironmongers or shops which only sell buttons or ribbons – it’s a great mix.

Although this area has historically been synonymous with high quality medical care, there were few osteopaths practising here when I first started.  Because of that, establishing my practice was reasonably straightforward, and I was lucky enough to be based in the world renowned pharmacy/healthcare retailer, John Bell & Croyden, which helped my exposure. Setting up a clinic in this area now would be very difficult because of the greater competition involved due to a much increased number of healthcare practitioners of all kinds. I’ve benefited from my long established good reputation, both among Marylebone residents and the people who commute to this area every day.

How have you seen the area change in your time here?

Sadly, some of the smaller businesses have inevitably gone over time, but it’s still an area of great diversity and individuality. Recently, John Bell & Croyden – where my clinic is – underwent a massive refurbishment and changed from having the look and feel of a shop very much resembling ‘Are You Being Served’ to a fantastically modern, state-of-the-art showpiece of health care.  One which still retains the individually focused approach to its customers though, with excellent staff who have a wealth of knowledge.

My clinic too now has a new look and I’m very happy to still be able to provide the same individually centred service to my patients I have always done, but from a much sleeker and professional looking premises. I expanded the clinic, so that now my husband, Vince Cullen – another osteopath with over 25 years of experience – works with me, as well my friend and colleague Mathilde Konczynski, who operates her BodySpheres group of osteopaths/physiotherapists from the Active Health Clinic a couple of days a week.

People seem to have less and less time to look after their personal health – do you have any small tips or changes that could improve our health?

Recently, more and more evidence has come to light about the wide-ranging detrimental effects on our health from spending many hours a day sitting down; even if we make time for exercise outside of work. Our bodies simply aren’t designed to sit all day, we’re designed to be regularly moving around, but sadly sitting has become what most of us do most of the time.

Many people with back/neck problems find it helpful to stand for at least some of the time they are working, rather than sit for many hours.  However, not everyone has the benefit of a sit/stand desk that can be adjusted to the appropriate height. Regularly getting up from the desk and walking to do tasks, going to speak to someone in another office instead of calling or emailing them, standing whilst making phone calls or whilst chatting to colleagues, all add a surprising amount of activity to the day as well helping our muscles to stretch and work, and our circulation to flow.

One more tip is to drink plenty of fluid (non-alcoholic!) to assist the body in balancing its many physiological processes that cope with all the hardship we throw at it, and to prevent dehydration causing widespread effects on the optimum function of the body systems. Even slight dehydration has been found to impair physical and mental performance – and of course, drinking plenty of non-alcoholic fluid counters the pain of drinking too much of the alcoholic kind!

I could go on and on here, but the importance of getting regular good quality sleep is frequently overlooked. Increasingly, researchers are finding negative consequences to disrupted sleep, such as raised risks of heart disease, diabetes and mental health issues.

Do you think 9-5 office jobs are to blame for many of your patients?

At the Active Health Clinic, we see people presenting with a wide variety of complaints.  Because we see residents who live in the Marylebone area, as well as those working there, we see all kinds of people – from small babies to the very elderly. However, inevitably a large proportion of our patients are office workers who present with conditions associated with stress, poor work-station ergonomics, and (again!) simply spending too many hours sitting doing the same activity. In addition, they may try and counter this by going to do some form of explosive exercise a few times a week in order to ‘let off steam’; the two extremes can lead to their own problems.  In reality, I know many of my patients would be only too happy doing a 9-5 job – most do much longer hours than this – and sadly, even if you have the best ergonomic work set-up possible, sitting all day at it, especially in a stressful environment, is not going to be best for your health.

Do you spend much time around Marylebone? Any favourites?

I love Marylebone and I often meet friends here after work or for lunch. My favourite lunch-time haunt is the wonderful deli-café, Paul Rothe & Son, on Marylebone Lane. It’s like going back in time to a quirky ‘50s diner (but with much better food!) and it has a huge variety on offer, with any combination seemingly possible.  As well as this, the walls are covered with jars and tins of fabulously original sweets, spreads, biscuits, chocolates and savoury snacks.  It’s fantastic for Christmas presents too, with seasonal munchings from all over Europe, as well as great stocking-fillers for kids. I remember I bought a tin of chocolates there one year, which doubled as a music box. The next year I bought my first tin of chocolate worms! Fabulous!

More info: activehealthclinic.com Phone: 0207 486 8141


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In Profile: Miisa Mink http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-miisa-mink/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-miisa-mink/#respond Fri, 21 Aug 2015 03:24:08 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3240 Miisa Mink is investor and chairman of Nordic Bakery, a design café chain with two stores in Marylebone. What brought you to London originally? We specifically chose London because it is such a vibrant and creative place to work and we could see that people who were living and working here were not being offered an alternative [...]

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Miisa Mink is investor and chairman of Nordic Bakery, a design café chain with two stores in Marylebone.

What brought you to London originally?

We specifically chose London because it is such a vibrant and creative place to work and we could see that people who were living and working here were not being offered an alternative to the over tired, over saturated mainstream coffee shop brands.

Londoners are very open minded and willing to try new things and we thought that they would appreciate our offering – a quiet, stylish place to enjoy our Nordic dark rye bread, cinnamon buns and coffee. Somewhere with a different atmosphere, somewhere that would appeal to grown-ups.

Nordic Bakery has clearly gained a strong following in the capital; did you ever expect such success? 

We have a very clear idea of what we are offering and have built the brand organically to gain a loyal following. Success comes from having a solid foundation and we believe that we’ve got that and providing we continue to stick to our ethos, our popularity will continue to grow in London. I could have not expected we become so popular and I’m very grateful to all our fans that have supported us over the years.

Do you think Marylebone’s neighbourhood atmosphere suits Nordic Bakery?

Two of our three coffee shops are in the Marylebone area (New Cavendish Street and Dorset Street). It’s a loyal neighbourhood that reflects our ethos – lasting quality, no gimmicks and good honest design and food. People live here, work here and socialise here and that’s important to us because Nordic Bakery is not a fly-by-night business. We work with and for the Marylebone community seven days a week.

Is there an average Nordic Bakery customer, if so who are they?

Our cafes are popular with a wide demographic of people yet all are looking for a peaceful place where they can relax or meet with business colleagues. Community is important to us and so a lot of our customers are people who are living and working in the neighbourhoods that we serve – everyone from doctors, writers and architects through to bankers and accountants. We’re also popular with families especially in New Cavendish Street which is a bit more residential.

Other customers are visiting London and have sought us out as a special place to visit. We do get customers from Scandinavia but not exclusively so because our offering appeals to an international clientele who appreciate our simple Nordic aesthetics.

I would say what is common to all our customers is an appreciation of quality and aesthetics. They are people who often want just that little bit more from their coffee shop experience and appreciate the freshly baked cakes and buns we make on-site every day.

What’s your favourite recipe in the Nordic Bakery cookbook?

It has got to be our cinnamon bun! Every Nordic mum and grandmother has their own version of this Nordic classic. At home I usually make my cinnamon buns a little smaller than the ones we serve at the cafes (and you can find the recipe for these soft cinnamon buns on page of 89 of Nordic Bakery cookbook).

The love for the cinnamon buns in the Nordic countries is so great that there’s a day dedicated to them – 4 October. At Nordic Bakery we are running a whole week of cinnamon bun celebrations (from 28 September to 4 October) and offering our customers a different variety of cinnamon bun mid-week and then baking all the varieties at the weekend.   So everyone gets to try a new version of our cinnamon bun.   We’ve also created a special cinnamon and apple cake and will be selling this during the week too.

There’s lots of Scandinavian influence in Marylebone – particularly design. Do you have any favourites?

I believe that good design is thing of beauty that can bring harmony into our lives and the design elements that we’ve incorporated into Nordic Bakery are part of the restful ambience we’ve created.

I’m a big fan of classic timeless design, for example the Teema mug designed by Kaj Franck back in the 1950’s. Iittala uses the same design today yet every time it adds a new colour, it complements those dating back to the 1950’s. There’s something comforting about a Teema mug and we mix and match them with Teema plates at Nordic Bakery; they complement the honest food we sell.

And our Marylebone customers can also experience the simplicity and craftsmanship of furniture designed by Alvar Aalto and Ilmari Tapiovaara in our Dorset Street and New Cavendish Street cafes.

There are a lot of good Scandinavian design in the shops around Marylebone – Marimekko, Mouki Mou and Scandium.

Nordic design tends to be functional and minimalistic and I like to mix this with pieces that are rich and sensual. One of my personal favourites is the Design Guild shop on Marylebone High Street. I adore the colourful, decorative fabrics and accessories. They’re very inspirational and they complement my 1880’s English countryside house perfectly. I have also found some great interior design finds at Lewis & Co on Paddington Street.

Aside from design, where else do you enjoy in Marylebone?

I enjoy the cocktail bar ‘Purl’, where you get a multi-sensory experience and I love how they have created a very unique atmosphere with design, lighting and details.

The design aesthetics and attention to detail at the Indian restaurant Trishna on Blandford Street appeals to me, rather than the traditional style of Indian restaurants.

Marylebone is wonderful area and I enjoy the relaxed, village feel and am always inspired by the people who live and work there.


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In Profile: Joe Fournier http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/lifestyle/in-profile-joe-fournier/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/lifestyle/in-profile-joe-fournier/#respond Fri, 14 Aug 2015 03:32:54 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3232 Joe Fournier is the Bonbonniere club in New York, London and Mykonos and has recently opened Hotel Chantelle in Marylebone… What attracted you to Marylebone as the site of Hotel Chantelle? Marylebone is already a hot spot full of A-list celebrities and upcoming restaurants and cafe’s. It’s the perfect location to start a restaurant and [...]

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Joe Fournier is the Bonbonniere club in New York, London and Mykonos and has recently opened Hotel Chantelle in Marylebone…

What attracted you to Marylebone as the site of Hotel Chantelle?

Marylebone is already a hot spot full of A-list celebrities and upcoming restaurants and cafe’s. It’s the perfect location to start a restaurant and attracts the Mayfair crowd as well as A-listers who frequent the area.

What encouraged you to move from nightclubs/bars to the restaurant scene?

Nightclubs are fantastic high energy venues which are the only places which can attract anyone from any different background – whether you are a young student, an established businessman, a billionaire, a music star or an A-list actor. I wanted to use my wealth of contacts and apply it to a new avenue which is restaurants because it mixes the skills I learnt operating top nightlife establishments whilst providing the customer service and consistently high quality of food which I think we have done with the huge media buzz Hotel Chantelle has created.

What’s been the highlight of your year so far?

Being deemed the Richard Branson of nightlife and featured for my business acumen following the successes of BonBonniere London, New York, Mykonos, Streaky Gin and Hotel Chantelle launching. It’s flattering.

Your job must be fun – do you have a favourite part?

I love giving people the very best experiences at my venues and creating branded concepts which people enjoy and take with them as memorable experiences. I dare to be different, unique, and I love creating an atmosphere where everyone can feel like a rockstar.

Any favourites on the menu at Hotel Chantelle?

I highly recommend the chicken and waffle which is presented like candy floss – and the lamb.

Can we expect a celebrity clientele at Hotel Chantelle, like many of your other venues?

Yes. We already have had a few high profile A-list actors and musicians who have personally requested private hires and tables. You will see them shortly…

Where else do you spend time in Marylebone?

I live in between Miami and my new BonBonniere Mykonos but when in Marylebone, I do love dinners at Chiltern Firehouse and popping into Selfridges.


Hotel Chantelle opened on Marylebone’s Orchard Street in July.


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In Profile: Alan Cook http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-alan-cook/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-alan-cook/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 15:17:31 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3222 Alan Cook, Manager of The Montagu and The Churchill Bar & Terrace, joined us to explain how his 30-year career has taken him from pot washing to London’s finest hotel bars. How did you begin working in hospitality? My passion for the hospitality industry began at the age of 16, when I arrived in the [...]

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Alan Cook, Manager of The Montagu and The Churchill Bar & Terrace, joined us to explain how his 30-year career has taken him from pot washing to London’s finest hotel bars.

How did you begin working in hospitality?

Alan Cook ChurchillMy passion for the hospitality industry began at the age of 16, when I arrived in the UK from my homeland of Zimbabwe.  It was then that I started work in a restaurant in Scotland washing dishes and preparing the salad bar, before being promoted to waiter.

30 years later my career has allowed me to work with some amazing teams in fantastic bars from The Churchill here at Hyatt Regency London to The Rivoli Bar at The Ritz, The Lanesborough, The Hempel Hotel and The Playboy Club. One of the highlights of my career has to be working on special private events for the Queen, including her 80th birthday party.

How long have you been managing The Churchill Bar & Terrace and The Montagu?

I joined Hyatt Regency London as Manager of The Churchill Bar & Terrace in October 2012. Then in 2015 I took on the managerial position at The Montagu restaurant, The Churchill Bar & Terrace and kitchen team.

What is the best part of your job?

Oh that is so hard to say, as I actually love it all.  I so enjoy creating fun and exciting promotions, from the Mad Hatter’s Afternoon Tea we are currently hosting, to working with the team to create amazing cocktails at The Churchill Bar & Terrace.  Spending time with my team is another highlight, they are wonderful and are always eager to learn and develop further, which is incredibly rewarding for me.  Then of course there are our fantastic guests. Many of whom I have known for years and love welcoming back, as well as getting to know the new ones who walk through our doors.

What are your favourites on the menu?

My favourite cocktails on the menu at The Churchill Bar have to be the ‘Teapot Cocktails’, which were created with a link to the prohibition era when alcohol was being secretly produced and consumed in hidden locations. Our Teapot Cocktails are served table-side in vintage silver tea sets creating a truly unique experience. All of our cocktails have great stories behind them relating to Winston Churchill, and come with their own recipe cards.

At The Montagu, my favourite dish is the Crispy goat’s cheese, baby courgettes, artichokes and watercress pesto, but we have just launched our new summer menu so this is likely to change to another favourite soon!

What is next for The Churchill Bar?  Any summer highlights?

To celebrate summer, The Churchill Bar has transformed its terrace area in to an English garden, and our team have created an array of exceptional summer cocktails including the ‘Eton Mess-Take’, which is our creative take on the Eaton Mess.  We are also offering a series of specialised picnic hampers, where guests can choose from a selection of traditional picnic treats to enjoy on our terrace.

Do you spend much time around Marylebone?  Any favourites?

Not enough time really, but when I do I really enjoy it!  When I am on Marylebone High Street, I can’t help but pop in to La Fromagerie for a quick cheese fix, The Ginger Pig for some of their amazing meats and then I always seem to find something I never knew I wanted in The Conran Shop!


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In Profile: Adrian Whitefoord http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-adrian-whitefoord/ http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/in-profile/in-profile-adrian-whitefoord/#comments Mon, 11 May 2015 03:29:48 +0000 http://maryleboneonline.co.uk/?p=3183 Pemberton & Whitefoord is a design consultancy based on Marylebone’s Ivor Place. We sat down with cofounder Adrian Whitefoord, who has been based in the area for over 25 years, to talk design, business and Marylebone. Tell us about your background and how you started the business We started the business in 1987, so we’ve [...]

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Pemberton & Whitefoord is a design consultancy based on Marylebone’s Ivor Place. We sat down with cofounder Adrian Whitefoord, who has been based in the area for over 25 years, to talk design, business and Marylebone.


Tell us about your background and how you started the business

We started the business in 1987, so we’ve been around for a while! I met my partner Simon Pemberton at college in Maidstone, we shared a flat together and formed the company after working for a couple of different agencies each. We’d always talked about starting an agency from our college days.

In the early days we did a lot of print and brochure work, but we started to move more towards branding and packaging. Looking back, that wasn’t a considered decision, it was the way the work drove us. What we like to try and preach is that we’re not just focused on the packaging side of things – it’s really everything that supports a brand and the most exciting part is having the diversity of work within each relationship with a client.

How did you win your first big client?

We were a two man band when we set up and we’re now an agency of about 20 staff. I suppose this is our comfort zone – we’re both trained as designers and don’t want to just be business managers, we want to still be involved with the design process.

We were lucky to win a couple of core clients very early on, one of which is Tesco who are our biggest client and then also Marks and Spencer who were a three minute walk from our office on Baker Street. Nowadays I don’t think we would have been perceived as big enough hitters to have won that kind of work, but I think we’re very honest about what we do and that helped, as well as the fact that we were nearby at the time and on tap for them.

Have you won any awards?

We were actually having a count the other day – we thought we’d won 82, but it turns out we’ve actually won 108 awards over the years!

The thing about awards is they’re always nice to win and they look great, but from my point of view if you win an award it’s not just so you can pat yourself on the back, but it’s more that you’ve done right by your client. Hopefully I think that’s why we build longstanding relationships with clients.

Pemberton & Whitefoord

What’s the hardest part about running a creative business?

I think trying to keep that consistency of quality and thinking about where you’re going to be in the future. We try not just accept briefs but challenge them, think about trends and look to help our clients stay ahead of the game. Retail is moving at quite a pace, so we have to make sure we’re in tune with everything that’s going on. It’s not like learning a craft that then stands still – it’s definitely ever changing.

Has digital changed things?

Massively – when we started Simon and I had a couple of drawing boards each and some magic markers. Without sounding like a Monty Python sketch, that’s all we had! If you were working a piece of typography, you would be hand drawing it – it was a complete different world. Lot’s of industries have shifted, but design in particular used to be very craft based – now it’s a very technological business. We’ve gone from magic markers to the highest spec Mac’s. We have to accept that evolution, but also not lose sight of the reasons we went into the industry to begin with. It’s a constant challenge.

Have you always been based in Marylebone?

We’ve always been around this area from the start. Initially we were renting a small room on Gloucester Place and then we moved to Plympton Street just on the other side of Marylebone Station before moving here on Ivor Place where we’ve been for a number of years. It’s a great from a commuting point of view and you can be in the hustle and bustle of London and in Regent’s Park in equal measures. I think we’re very fortunate to be between the two and we’ve never really had aspirations to move – our office is eccentric as a space as it’s on 3 floors and more of a residential property, but it generates a nice spirit.

How have you seen Marylebone change over the last few years?

I think it’s changed from being an area that’s a little bit nondescript to being one of the nicest areas in London. Traversing Marylebone High Street looking at great shops and restaurants, there’s a great atmosphere but it can also be so quiet and peaceful here.

Things have certainly changed, but I think there will always be room for both the high end and the more quirky, independent shops. There will always be an Alfie’s Market at one end and a Conran Shop at the other!

Do you spend much time around Marylebone? Any favourites?

The Seashell Restaurant is probably the best fish and chip restaurant in the world! And if I have a spare 45 minutes over lunch I always like to wonder down Marylebone High Street. There’s always something interesting to see, some great shops and restaurants – I’m always sucked into The Conran Shop, I can’t resist that one! And The Orrery restaurant above Conran is probably my favourite.


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